Scottish lawyer denies death of Lockerbie bomber Abdelbaset Ali al-Megrahi

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Scottish lawyer denies death of Lockerbie bomber Abdelbaset Ali al-Megrahi

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

A Scottish lawyer today denied reports that Lockerbie bomber Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed Al Megrahi had died, after it was reported on Sky News earlier today that “unidentified sources” had said that he was dead.

The reports came onto Sky News at around 16.00 BST today. The information could not be confirmed, and it was not immediately clear where Sky News had obtained their information. Megrahi is suffering from terminal prostate cancer. Scottish Cabinet Secretary for Justice Kenny MacAskill MSP decided on 20 August 2009 to grant Megrahi compassionate release from Greenock Prison in Glasgow, Scotland and to allow him to return to Libya, after medical advisers reported that he was likely to die in just three months.

On Wednesday, Megrahi’s lawyer, Tony Kelly, responded to the claims made, saying that “it’s absolutely untrue. He’s definitely not dead. I’m not saying anything about his health condition other than the fact he is alive and breathing.” He declined to release any information about Abdelbaset’s current health condition. Following these comments, Sky News removed the information from their website.

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  • Paramedics protest outside New South Wales parliament

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    Paramedics protest outside New South Wales parliament

    Tuesday, July 22, 2008

    Paramedics employed by the Ambulance Service of New South Wales in Australia marched on the New South Wales parliament today. They called for the Government to sack Ambulance Service of New South Wales CEO Greg Rochford, hire 300 additional ambulance officers and 60 patient transport officers. Paramedics gave the Government 48 hours to agree to the proposed staffing levels or face industrial action.

    “We are currently at the same levels of staffing that we had in 2002 and these not withstanding, also there’s been an increase in workload of 5 per cent per year every year since then,” said Health Services Union general secretary Michael Williamson.

    The union also called for chief executive Greg Roachford and other senior management to be sacked over what has been described as a culture of bullying.

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    Where To Find Quality Used Rims

    Posted in Earthmoving Machines | May 23rd, 2020

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    byadmin

    If you are looking to customize your car, you have several different options. There are only so many vehicles in the world, so you need to make yours stand out in different ways. Choosing some quality used rims is a great way to make a statement. If you are considering buying your rims used, you need to make sure you choose a team of professionals as your supplier. Don’t buy your rims from just anywhere. You need to buy them from professional mechanics.

    Buy from Mechanics

    When you are choosing used rims, you should make sure you buy them from quality mechanics who do more than just sell rims. It’s even better if they do quality tire work and body repairs. Such experience means they will know precisely how to place a tire on the rim and balance your vehicle. They’ll also be able to assess the rims for any kind of problem that might arise. There are sometimes small structural problems with rims that might go unnoticed if someone is not a mechanic.

    Wide Selection

    You should choose a company that has a wide selection of rims. The Tire Shop is an example of just such a place. They have several different options available that are constantly being updated.

    Choosing Rims

    Choosing which rims are right for you can be somewhat difficult as well. There are some considerations you have to make. First, you have to choose which size rims you need. If you want bigger rims that are more dramatic, you’re going to need to make sure you have enough space in your wheel wells for them. You would also need thinner tires.

    Next, you’ll need to decide on brake calipers and possible adjustments to some other parts of your vehicle. All of these factors are important for you to consider when you talk with a mechanic about getting new rims.

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    Canadian helicopter with 18 onboard crashes into Atlantic Ocean

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    Canadian helicopter with 18 onboard crashes into Atlantic Ocean
    Posted in Uncategorized | May 23rd, 2020

    Friday, March 13, 2009

    Two life boats were empty, one person is dead and sixteen others are missing after a helicopter crashed into the frigid north Atlantic Ocean reported search and rescue official, March 12. The Sikorsky S92 helicopter sunk below the surface and the debris field was located about 47 nautical miles (87 km; 54 mi) southeast of St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador.

    Maydays and alerts were sent at 9:18 local NL time (7:48 EST). The helicopter pilot radioed his intent to return to St. John’s.File:CHC S-92.jpg

    The lone survivor, Robert Decker, was taken to a local hospital in critical condition. He was rescued by a helicopter which arrived 45 minutes after take off.

    Of the eighteen people on board one other body was found and taken to St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador. The cause of the crash is under investigation, but Canadian prime minister Stephen Harper called the incident a “tragic accident”. Julie Leroux of the Transportation Safety Board said that mechanical problems were reported on the helicopter, but further investigation was needed.

    Earlier reports stated that two people and a life raft were seen in the waters 87 kilometers (54 miles) southeast of St. John’s. There were reports of a second life raft as well. Rescuers soon discovered that the life rafts were empty.

    For those wearing survival suits, the survival time would be approximately 24 hours. Wave heights at the time of the crash were six to nine feet (two to three meters), with freezing water temperatures. As a result, emergency rooms at St. John’s hospital were prepared for survivors suffering from hypothermia reported Deborah Collins of the Eastern Health Board.

    On board were workers heading to two offshore oilfields, mainly the Sea Rose platform, a part of the White Rose offshore oilfield 315 kilometers (196 miles) southeast of St. John’s. Two people on board were staff of Cougar Helicopters, and two passengers traveling to the Hibernia platform.

    Two Cormorant rescue helicopters and one military Hercules plane flew into high winds during the rescue effort. The search and rescue team was supplemented by a coast guard ship and supply ship. There were reports that two other helicopters were dispatched as well.

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    News briefs:April 28, 2005

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    News briefs:April 28, 2005
    Posted in Uncategorized | May 23rd, 2020

    Thursday, April 28, 2005

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    HIV-positive man receives 35 years for spitting on Dallas police officer

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    HIV-positive man receives 35 years for spitting on Dallas police officer
    Posted in Uncategorized | May 21st, 2020

    Sunday, May 18, 2008

    An HIV-positive man was sentenced to 35 years in prison Wednesday, one day after being convicted of harassment of a public servant for spitting into the eye and open mouth of a Dallas, Texas police officer in May 2006. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that no one has ever contracted HIV from saliva, and a gay-rights and AIDS advocacy group called the sentence excessive.

    A Dallas County jury concluded that Willie Campbell’s act of spitting on policeman Dan Waller in 2006 constituted the use of his saliva as a deadly weapon. The incident occurred while Campbell, 42, was resisting arrest while being taken into custody for public intoxication.

    “He turns and spits. He hits me in the eye and mouth. Then he told me he has AIDS. I immediately began looking for something to flush my eyes with,” said Waller to The Dallas Morning News.

    Officer Waller responded after a bystander reported seeing an unconscious male lying outside a building. Dallas County prosecutors stated that Campbell attempted to fight paramedics and kicked the police officer who arrested him for public intoxication.

    It’s been 25 years since the virus was identified, but there are still lots of fears.

    Prosecutors said that Campbell yelled that he was innocent during the trial, and claimed a police officer was lying. Campbell’s lawyer Russell Heinrichs said that because he had a history of convictions including similarly attacking two other police officers, biting inmates, and other offenses, he was indicted under a habitual offender statute. The statute increased his minimum sentence to 25 years in prison. Because the jury ruled that Campbell’s saliva was used as a deadly weapon, he will not be eligible for parole until completing at least half his sentence.

    If you look at the facts of this case, it was clear that the defendant intended to cause serious bodily injury.

    The organization Lambda Legal (Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund), which advocates for individuals living with HIV, says that saliva should not be considered a deadly weapon. Bebe Anderson, the HIV projects director at Lambda Legal, spoke with The Dallas Morning News about the sentence. “It’s been 25 years since the virus was identified, but there are still lots of fears,” said Anderson.

    The Dallas County prosecutor who handled the trial, Jenni Morse, said that the deadly weapon finding was justified. “No matter how minuscule, there is some risk. That means there is the possibility of causing serious bodily injury or death,” said Morse. Dallas County District Attorney Craig Watkins stated: “If you look at the facts of this case, it was clear that the defendant intended to cause serious bodily injury.”

    Contact with saliva, tears, or sweat has never been shown to result in transmission of HIV.

    A page at the CDC’s website, HIV and Its Transmission, states: “HIV has been found in saliva and tears in very low quantities from some AIDS patients.” The subsection “Saliva, Tears, and Sweat” concludes that: “Contact with saliva, tears, or sweat has never been shown to result in transmission of HIV.” On Friday the Dallas County Health Department released a statement explaining that HIV is most commonly spread through sexual contact, sharing needles, or transfusion from an infected blood product.

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    Housebreaking Dogs And Puppies A Step By Step Guide To Potty Training Your Dog Or Puppy}

    Posted in Dogs | May 21st, 2020

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    Submitted by: Tony Norton

    If you’re reading this I think it’s safe to assume that you either currently own, or are about to buy, a dog or puppy and don’t want to come home to nasty “surprises” on your living room floor. That’s why I’m writing this step by step guide to potty training your adult dog or puppy.

    Before I get into the details of how to do this I want to take a second to say that this is not a difficult thing to do. It’s a pretty straight forward process and anybody can get great results! It DOES however require both consistancy and diligence on your part to make sure that your dog or puppy is really and truly housebroken.

    It also helps to have a basic understanding of the way your dog thinks. They rely on instincts to tell them what to do, it’s important that you understand this and not allow yourself to start attributing human feelings and motivations to them. They are pack animals. If you really want to understand your dog and effectively train him I suggest taking the time to really study pack behavior and animal instinct.

    However, if you don’t have the interest or time to dedicate to studying the things that drives your dog’s behavior here’s a quick run down of what you need to do to teach your dog to “go” outside.

    1. Always watch your puppy for signs that he needs to eliminate. Things like sniffing around the floor are a sure sign that your puppy is looking for a good spot to go. As you go along you’ll start to recognize the signs that your dog needs to go potty.

    2. IMMEDIATELY take him outside as soon as you see that he needs to potty. Also designate a specific place in the yard for him to do his business, take him there and repeat a specific command like “Do it here.” until he eliminates.

    YouTube Preview Image

    3. As soon as he eliminates give him lots of praise. This is positive enforcement and is extremely important to this whole process. We want the dog to know that when he does what we want him to do something pleasent happens.

    4. We also want our dog to know that EVERY TIME he does something we don’t want him to do, something unpleasent happens. This is why it’s critically important to correct the dog when he has an “accident” in the house. If you have to go to work or leave for whatever reason and aren’t able to supervise your dog you need to keep him in a crate inside or an enclosed dog run outside. Don’t just leave your dog unsupervised outside while you’re gone as this can lead to other problems.

    When you give your dog a “correction” it has to be motivational or you might as well not bother. By motivational I mean something that gets his attention and makes him understand that he just did something wrong.

    For this I highly recommend a pinch collar or an electronic shock collar for adult dogs. For a puppy it’s enough to grab them by the scruff of the neck and give a vigorous shake and pinch.

    It’s critical that you administer the correction immediately after the dog does whatever you don’t want him to do, in this case pottying in the house. Dogs have a very short term memory, if you don’t correct him immediately he won’t understand what he did wrong or why you’re correcting him.

    If you aren’t physically close enough to perform the correction immediately you can buy yourself some time by yelling “NO NO NO NO NO” while you run to him. By doing this the dog will associate what he just did with the correction you give him once you get there. This will only buy you around 10-15 seconds, so you need to be quick.

    NEVER under any circumstances physically strike your dog. It’s abuse and can only damage your relationship with him. After all, you want a companion that you can love and who loves you, nobody loves somebody that beats them.

    5. Set up a specific schedule for feeding and watering your dog and stick to it. Take him outside immediately afterwards and go to the designated spot. Keep repeating your “elimination command” until he goes and then praise him.

    6. Accidents are going to happen. You might as well get used to that idea now. That’s why I suggest investing in enzymatic cleaning agent. Your local pet store should have a selection of these available, pick one out and use it on the spots where your dog eliminates in the house.

    I don’t suggest using any of the home made cleansers you’ll find all over the internet. The reason is they almost all make use of either water or amonia or fragrances. Water will only spread the stain out, amonia is created by the breakdown of the urine and can confuse the dog into thinking it’s ok to go there agtain. Fragrances just cover up the problem for us, remember your dog’s sence of smell is many times better than ours and he’ll still smell the spot thru the fragrance and think it’s ok to go there.

    Enzymatic cleaners use enzymes to actually break down the stain on a molecular level. The enzymes actually “eat up” the stain and leave nothing behind for the dog to smell.

    If the dog eliminates in the crate or dog run while you’re away don’t give a correction, he won’t know why you’re doing it anyway. Just take him outside and follow the advice in numbers 2 and 3 above. Then clean up the crate with soap and water and use your enzymatic cleaning agent to get rid of what’s left over.

    That about covers it. Just remember that you can do this, it just takes dedication and diligence on your part. Sure it’s a bit of work, but the benefits far outweigh the trouble you’ll have to go thru. You won’t have to worry about your floors or furniture being ruined, your dog will know exactly what you expect of him and you’ll both be happier as a result.

    Now you can spend more time bonding and actually having fun with your dog!

    Thanks for reading this article, I hope you found it usefull.

    About the Author: Tony Norton, (

    Dog-Training-Resources-Online.com

    ) Tony is the owner and editor of

    Dog-Training-Resources-Online.com

    He’s trained numerous dogs over the years for both himself and others. Please be sure to visit his website for great dog training tips and a free 7day course on training your own dog.

    Source:

    isnare.com

    Permanent Link:

    isnare.com/?aid=9158&ca=Pets}

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    National Museum of Scotland reopens after three-year redevelopment

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    National Museum of Scotland reopens after three-year redevelopment
    Posted in Uncategorized | May 20th, 2020

    Friday, July 29, 2011

    Today sees the reopening of the National Museum of Scotland following a three-year renovation costing £47.4 million (US$ 77.3 million). Edinburgh’s Chambers Street was closed to traffic for the morning, with the 10am reopening by eleven-year-old Bryony Hare, who took her first steps in the museum, and won a competition organised by the local Evening News paper to be a VIP guest at the event. Prior to the opening, Wikinews toured the renovated museum, viewing the new galleries, and some of the 8,000 objects inside.

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    Dressed in Victorian attire, Scottish broadcaster Grant Stott acted as master of ceremonies over festivities starting shortly after 9am. The packed street cheered an animatronic Tyrannosaurus Rex created by Millenium FX; onlookers were entertained with a twenty-minute performance by the Mugenkyo Taiko Drummers on the steps of the museum; then, following Bryony Hare knocking three times on the original doors to ask that the museum be opened, the ceremony was heralded with a specially composed fanfare – played on a replica of the museum’s 2,000-year-old carnyx Celtic war-horn. During the fanfare, two abseilers unfurled white pennons down either side of the original entrance.

    The completion of the opening to the public was marked with Chinese firecrackers, and fireworks, being set off on the museum roof. As the public crowded into the museum, the Mugenkyo Taiko Drummers resumed their performance; a street theatre group mingled with the large crowd, and the animatronic Tyrannosaurus Rex entertained the thinning crowd of onlookers in the centre of the street.

    On Wednesday, the museum welcomed the world’s press for an in depth preview of the new visitor experience. Wikinews was represented by Brian McNeil, who is also Wikimedia UK’s interim liaison with Museum Galleries Scotland.

    The new pavement-level Entrance Hall saw journalists mingle with curators. The director, Gordon Rintoul, introduced presentations by Gareth Hoskins and Ralph Applebaum, respective heads of the Architects and Building Design Team; and, the designers responsible for the rejuvenation of the museum.

    Describing himself as a “local lad”, Hoskins reminisced about his grandfather regularly bringing him to the museum, and pushing all the buttons on the numerous interactive exhibits throughout the museum. Describing the nearly 150-year-old museum as having become “a little tired”, and a place “only visited on a rainy day”, he commented that many international visitors to Edinburgh did not realise that the building was a public space; explaining the focus was to improve access to the museum – hence the opening of street-level access – and, to “transform the complex”, focus on “opening up the building”, and “creating a number of new spaces […] that would improve facilities and really make this an experience for 21st century museum visitors”.

    Hoskins explained that a “rabbit warren” of storage spaces were cleared out to provide street-level access to the museum; the floor in this “crypt-like” space being lowered by 1.5 metres to achieve this goal. Then Hoskins handed over to Applebaum, who expressed his delight to be present at the reopening.

    Applebaum commented that one of his first encounters with the museum was seeing “struggling young mothers with two kids in strollers making their way up the steps”, expressing his pleasure at this being made a thing of the past. Applebaum explained that the Victorian age saw the opening of museums for public access, with the National Museum’s earlier incarnation being the “College Museum” – a “first window into this museum’s collection”.

    Have you any photos of the museum, or its exhibits?

    The museum itself is physically connected to the University of Edinburgh’s old college via a bridge which allowed students to move between the two buildings.

    Applebaum explained that the museum will, now redeveloped, be used as a social space, with gatherings held in the Grand Gallery, “turning the museum into a social convening space mixed with knowledge”. Continuing, he praised the collections, saying they are “cultural assets [… Scotland is] turning those into real cultural capital”, and the museum is, and museums in general are, providing a sense of “social pride”.

    McNeil joined the yellow group on a guided tour round the museum with one of the staff. Climbing the stairs at the rear of the Entrance Hall, the foot of the Window on the World exhibit, the group gained a first chance to see the restored Grand Gallery. This space is flooded with light from the glass ceiling three floors above, supported by 40 cast-iron columns. As may disappoint some visitors, the fish ponds have been removed; these were not an original feature, but originally installed in the 1960s – supposedly to humidify the museum; and failing in this regard. But, several curators joked that they attracted attention as “the only thing that moved” in the museum.

    The museum’s original architect was Captain Francis Fowke, also responsible for the design of London’s Royal Albert Hall; his design for the then-Industrial Museum apparently inspired by Joseph Paxton’s Crystal Palace.

    The group moved from the Grand Gallery into the Discoveries Gallery to the south side of the museum. The old red staircase is gone, and the Millennium Clock stands to the right of a newly-installed escalator, giving easier access to the upper galleries than the original staircases at each end of the Grand Gallery. Two glass elevators have also been installed, flanking the opening into the Discoveries Gallery and, providing disabled access from top-to-bottom of the museum.

    The National Museum of Scotland’s origins can be traced back to 1780 when the 11th Earl of Buchan, David Stuart Erskine, formed the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland; the Society being tasked with the collection and preservation of archaeological artefacts for Scotland. In 1858, control of this was passed to the government of the day and the National Museum of Antiquities of Scotland came into being. Items in the collection at that time were housed at various locations around the city.

    On Wednesday, October 28, 1861, during a royal visit to Edinburgh by Queen Victoria, Prince-Consort Albert laid the foundation-stone for what was then intended to be the Industrial Museum. Nearly five years later, it was the second son of Victoria and Albert, Prince Alfred, the then-Duke of Edinburgh, who opened the building which was then known as the Scottish Museum of Science and Art. A full-page feature, published in the following Monday’s issue of The Scotsman covered the history leading up to the opening of the museum, those who had championed its establishment, the building of the collection which it was to house, and Edinburgh University’s donation of their Natural History collection to augment the exhibits put on public display.

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    Selection of views of the Grand Gallery Image: Brian McNeil.

    Selection of views of the Grand Gallery Image: Brian McNeil.

    Selection of views of the Grand Gallery Image: Brian McNeil.

    Closed for a little over three years, today’s reopening of the museum is seen as the “centrepiece” of National Museums Scotland’s fifteen-year plan to dramatically improve accessibility and better present their collections. Sir Andrew Grossard, chair of the Board of Trustees, said: “The reopening of the National Museum of Scotland, on time and within budget is a tremendous achievement […] Our collections tell great stories about the world, how Scots saw that world, and the disproportionate impact they had upon it. The intellectual and collecting impact of the Scottish diaspora has been profound. It is an inspiring story which has captured the imagination of our many supporters who have helped us achieve our aspirations and to whom we are profoundly grateful.

    The extensive work, carried out with a view to expand publicly accessible space and display more of the museums collections, carried a £47.4 million pricetag. This was jointly funded with £16 million from the Scottish Government, and £17.8 million from the Heritage Lottery Fund. Further funds towards the work came from private sources and totalled £13.6 million. Subsequent development, as part of the longer-term £70 million “Masterplan”, is expected to be completed by 2020 and see an additional eleven galleries opened.

    The funding by the Scottish Government can be seen as a ‘canny‘ investment; a report commissioned by National Museums Scotland, and produced by consultancy firm Biggar Economics, suggest the work carried out could be worth £58.1 million per year, compared with an estimated value to the economy of £48.8 prior to the 2008 closure. Visitor figures are expected to rise by over 20%; use of function facilities are predicted to increase, alongside other increases in local hospitality-sector spending.

    Proudly commenting on the Scottish Government’s involvement Fiona Hyslop, Cabinet Secretary for Culture and External Affairs, described the reopening as, “one of the nation’s cultural highlights of 2011” and says the rejuvenated museum is, “[a] must-see attraction for local and international visitors alike“. Continuing to extol the museum’s virtues, Hyslop states that it “promotes the best of Scotland and our contributions to the world.

    So-far, the work carried out is estimated to have increased the public space within the museum complex by 50%. Street-level storage rooms, never before seen by the public, have been transformed into new exhibit space, and pavement-level access to the buildings provided which include a new set of visitor facilities. Architectural firm Gareth Hoskins have retained the original Grand Gallery – now the first floor of the museum – described as a “birdcage” structure and originally inspired by The Crystal Palace built in Hyde Park, London for the 1851 Great Exhibition.

    The centrepiece in the Grand Gallery is the “Window on the World” exhibit, which stands around 20 metres tall and is currently one of the largest installations in any UK museum. This showcases numerous items from the museum’s collections, rising through four storeys in the centre of the museum. Alexander Hayward, the museums Keeper of Science and Technology, challenged attending journalists to imagine installing “teapots at thirty feet”.

    The redeveloped museum includes the opening of sixteen brand new galleries. Housed within, are over 8,000 objects, only 20% of which have been previously seen.

    • Ground floor
    • First floor
    • Second floor
    • Top floor

    The Window on the World rises through the four floors of the museum and contains over 800 objects. This includes a gyrocopter from the 1930s, the world’s largest scrimshaw – made from the jaws of a sperm whale which the University of Edinburgh requested for their collection, a number of Buddha figures, spearheads, antique tools, an old gramophone and record, a selection of old local signage, and a girder from the doomed Tay Bridge.

    The arrangement of galleries around the Grand Gallery’s “birdcage” structure is organised into themes across multiple floors. The World Cultures Galleries allow visitors to explore the culture of the entire planet; Living Lands explains the ways in which our natural environment influences the way we live our lives, and the beliefs that grow out of the places we live – from the Arctic cold of North America to Australia’s deserts.

    The adjacent Patterns of Life gallery shows objects ranging from the everyday, to the unusual from all over the world. The functions different objects serve at different periods in peoples’ lives are explored, and complement the contents of the Living Lands gallery.

    Performance & Lives houses musical instruments from around the world, alongside masks and costumes; both rooted in long-established traditions and rituals, this displayed alongside contemporary items showing the interpretation of tradition by contemporary artists and instrument-creators.

    The museum proudly bills the Facing the Sea gallery as the only one in the UK which is specifically based on the cultures of the South Pacific. It explores the rich diversity of the communities in the region, how the sea shapes the islanders’ lives – describing how their lives are shaped as much by the sea as the land.

    Both the Facing the Sea and Performance & Lives galleries are on the second floor, next to the new exhibition shop and foyer which leads to one of the new exhibition galleries, expected to house the visiting Amazing Mummies exhibit in February, coming from Leiden in the Netherlands.

    The Inspired by Nature, Artistic Legacies, and Traditions in Sculpture galleries take up most of the east side of the upper floor of the museum. The latter of these shows the sculptors from diverse cultures have, through history, explored the possibilities in expressing oneself using metal, wood, or stone. The Inspired by Nature gallery shows how many artists, including contemporary ones, draw their influence from the world around us – often commenting on our own human impact on that natural world.

    Contrastingly, the Artistic Legacies gallery compares more traditional art and the work of modern artists. The displayed exhibits attempt to show how people, in creating specific art objects, attempt to illustrate the human spirit, the cultures they are familiar with, and the imaginative input of the objects’ creators.

    The easternmost side of the museum, adjacent to Edinburgh University’s Old College, will bring back memories for many regular visitors to the museum; but, with an extensive array of new items. The museum’s dedicated taxidermy staff have produced a wide variety of fresh examples from the natural world.

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    At ground level, the Animal World and Wildlife Panorama’s most imposing exhibit is probably the lifesize reproduction of a Tyrannosaurus Rex skeleton. This rubs shoulders with other examples from around the world, including one of a pair of elephants. The on-display elephant could not be removed whilst renovation work was underway, and lurked in a corner of the gallery as work went on around it.

    Above, in the Animal Senses gallery, are examples of how we experience the world through our senses, and contrasting examples of wildly differing senses, or extremes of such, present in the natural world. This gallery also has giant screens, suspended in the free space, which show footage ranging from the most tranquil and peaceful life in the sea to the tooth-and-claw bloody savagery of nature.

    The Survival gallery gives visitors a look into the ever-ongoing nature of evolution; the causes of some species dying out while others thrive, and the ability of any species to adapt as a method of avoiding extinction.

    Earth in Space puts our place in the universe in perspective. Housing Europe’s oldest surviving Astrolabe, dating from the eleventh century, this gallery gives an opportunity to see the technology invented to allow us to look into the big questions about what lies beyond Earth, and probe the origins of the universe and life.

    In contrast, the Restless Earth gallery shows examples of the rocks and minerals formed through geological processes here on earth. The continual processes of the planet are explored alongside their impact on human life. An impressive collection of geological specimens are complemented with educational multimedia presentations.

    Beyond working on new galleries, and the main redevelopment, the transformation team have revamped galleries that will be familiar to regular past visitors to the museum.

    Formerly known as the Ivy Wu Gallery of East Asian Art, the Looking East gallery showcases National Museums Scotland’s extensive collection of Korean, Chinese, and Japanese material. The gallery’s creation was originally sponsored by Sir Gordon Wu, and named after his wife Ivy. It contains items from the last dynasty, the Manchu, and examples of traditional ceramic work. Japan is represented through artefacts from ordinary people’s lives, expositions on the role of the Samurai, and early trade with the West. Korean objects also show the country’s ceramic work, clothing, and traditional accessories used, and worn, by the indigenous people.

    The Ancient Egypt gallery has always been a favourite of visitors to the museum. A great many of the exhibits in this space were returned to Scotland from late 19th century excavations; and, are arranged to take visitors through the rituals, and objects associated with, life, death, and the afterlife, as viewed from an Egyptian perspective.

    The Art and Industry and European Styles galleries, respectively, show how designs are arrived at and turned into manufactured objects, and the evolution of European style – financed and sponsored by a wide range of artists and patrons. A large number of the objects on display, often purchased or commissioned, by Scots, are now on display for the first time ever.

    Shaping our World encourages visitors to take a fresh look at technological objects developed over the last 200 years, many of which are so integrated into our lives that they are taken for granted. Radio, transportation, and modern medicines are covered, with a retrospective on the people who developed many of the items we rely on daily.

    What was known as the Museum of Scotland, a modern addition to the classical Victorian-era museum, is now known as the Scottish Galleries following the renovation of the main building.

    This dedicated newer wing to the now-integrated National Museum of Scotland covers the history of Scotland from a time before there were people living in the country. The geological timescale is covered in the Beginnings gallery, showing continents arranging themselves into what people today see as familiar outlines on modern-day maps.

    Just next door, the history of the earliest occupants of Scotland are on display; hunters and gatherers from around 4,000 B.C give way to farmers in the Early People exhibits.

    The Kingdom of the Scots follows Scotland becoming a recognisable nation, and a kingdom ruled over by the Stewart dynasty. Moving closer to modern-times, the Scotland Transformed gallery looks at the country’s history post-union in 1707.

    Industry and Empire showcases Scotland’s significant place in the world as a source of heavy engineering work in the form of rail engineering and shipbuilding – key components in the building of the British Empire. Naturally, whisky was another globally-recognised export introduced to the world during empire-building.

    Lastly, Scotland: A Changing Nation collects less-tangible items, including personal accounts, from the country’s journey through the 20th century; the social history of Scots, and progress towards being a multicultural nation, is explored through heavy use of multimedia exhibits.

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    England: Fire at London Zoo kills aardvark, meerkats believed dead

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    England: Fire at London Zoo kills aardvark, meerkats believed dead
    Posted in Uncategorized | May 20th, 2020

    Sunday, December 24, 2017

    Fire broke out at London Zoo on Saturday morning, severely damaging a cafe and shop and killing an aardvark. Zoo officials said four meerkats were missing and were also presumed to be dead.

    The fire, mostly in the Animal Adventure cafe and shop, also spread to a nearby petting area. Reportedly, 72 firefighters with ten fire engines fought the blaze for about three hours starting shortly after 6:00 am to bring it under control. A spokesperson for the Fire Brigade stated that when they arrived, the fire was already “very well developed”. According to the ambulance service, two people were treated for minor injuries, six for smoke inhalation, with one taken to hospital. A statement from the zoo said, regarding animal fatalities, “Sadly our vets have confirmed the death of our nine-year-old aardvark, Misha. There are also four meerkats unaccounted for at this stage, and we have limited access to site to confirm this.” Other animals were said to be apparently unaffected.

    The zoo reported quick response by zoo security guards and by animal care staff who are housed at the zoo, which is in Regents Park; they moved animals to safety. A dog walker, Adnan Abdul Husein, told the BBC he had first noticed heavy smoke and alerted zoo security guards.

    Zoo officials initially said the zoo would be closed “until further notice” but later announced it would reopen today, Christmas Eve.

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    How To Buy A Mattress

    Posted in Music | May 20th, 2020

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    byAlma Abell

    Getting a good night’s rest requires having a good mattress. Finding a good mattress in West Des Moines, IA is as easy as in any other area, but you should know how to select the right one. You can start the search online as it is easier to determine what is available before going to a store. This will save you a lot of time as you will not have to run around trying to locate what you need. When you search online, you will know which stores to visit to test the mattresses being sold.

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    The good thing about buying a mattress in West Des Moines, IA is that you can get any type that is available in bigger cities. You can find those that are very modern such as Sleep Number, memory foam and of course, improved types of inner spring mattresses at the right supplier. Some of the things that you should look for include special features that the manufacturers provide to make their offer better than their competitors. Even though you can find a lot of information online, it is always better to go into a store to check the ones that appeal to you. It is only by trying a mattress that you can truly determine how firm it is.

    When buying a mattress, many salespersons will try to sell you on the spring count, but this is not all that important. The spring count is not a guarantee of the firmness or softness of a bed. In fact, many experts discount this as an important factor when trying to find the right mattress. You can easily click here to go to a source of information on types of mattresses that you can buy. You will find some of the best-known brands in the industry such as Sealy, BeautyRest, Serta and Tempurpedic. A site such as this is one will also provide information on the benefits of sleeping on a good mattress. With so many choices, it should be easy to find the mattress that you like at a good price. You should also ask if the store will allow you to test it before you make a final decision. Another important reminder is to get a warranty with your purchase.

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